Find content from previous months below

Mind Your Mental Health is Magellan Healthcare’s educational initiative designed to raise awareness about mental health and mental illness.

October—National Depression and Mental Health Awareness and Screening Month

This observance is designed to educate the public about the signs, symptoms and treatment options for depression, and to encourage those who might be suffering to respond to a brief, confidential battery of questions—a mental health screening. Learn more:

  • Depression is extremely common, and helping others know that they are not alone (thus reducing stigma) can be very encouraging. Read about depression.
  • Screenings aren’t considered a professional evaluation, but they are a quick and uncomplicated way to spot some of the early signs of potential trouble. Learn more.
  • Don’t be afraid to share your own experience of depression with those who are currently struggling. Find out how to talk to others. 

Visit our webpage to access additional, free resources and events for National Depression and Mental Health Awareness and Screening Month.

October 2021—Stamp Out Stigma—Mental Health Education

During the month of October, we are taking the opportunity this month to bring more awareness to general mental health education, as well as depression awareness.. It’s our job to help end the stigma surrounding mental health by sharing resources and starting conversations. We will encourage you to learn more about mental illness and what resources are available to help those find treatment.

September—Suicide Prevention Awareness Month

This observance raises awareness and connects individuals experiencing suicidal ideation to treatment services, in addition to offering support to those previously affected by suicide. Learn more:

September 2021—Stamp Out Stigma—National Recovery Month

During the month of September, we are taking the opportunity to discuss substance use disorder recovery. It’s our job to help end the stigma surrounding mental health by sharing resources and starting conversations. We will encourage you to learn more about mental illness and substance use disorder and what resources are available to help those find treatment. Here are some important facts you should know:

August—International Friendship Day

The first Sunday in August (8/1 this year) is International Friendship Day—a day to celebrate both the old and the new friends in our lives. Learn more:

August 2021—Stamp Out Stigma—Know the Facts

August is normally the back-to-school month for most students. This year might be a little different, so we are taking the opportunity to discuss student mental health throughout the month. Here are some important facts you should know:

July—BIPOC Mental Health Month

This health observance brings awareness to the unique struggles that individuals within the BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and People of Color) communities face in regard to mental illnessLearn more: 

July 2021—Stamp Out Stigma—Know the Facts

July is BIPOC Mental Health Month. As hard as it is for anyone to get proper mental health care in the United States, it’s even harder for racial, ethnic, religious and gender minorities. Not only are there the problems most of us experience, but there are added burdens of access and quality-of-care. Learn more:

  • Native Americans have the highest rate of young adult suicide of any ethnicity.
  • African Americans are 10% more likely to report having serious psychological distress than Non-Hispanic whites.
  • Lack of cultural understanding by health care providers may contribute to underdiagnosis and/or misdiagnosis of mental illness in people from racially/ethnically diverse populations.

June—National PTSD Awareness Month

Approximately eight million Americans at any given time suffer with post-traumatic stress disorder. This observance seeks to raise public awareness about issues related to PTSD, reduce the stigma associated with PTSD and help those suffering with this condition obtain needed treatment. Learn more:

  • PTSD can cause different types of symptoms. There are resources readily available to help diagnose and effectively treat PTSD. Learn the signs in this video.
  • Be there for support. When someone you care about has PTSD, the person may act differently and get angry easily. Follow these helpful tips.
  • Treatment is available. Helpful treatments include therapy, medications, peer support and more. Find treatment options.

June 2021—Stamp Out Stigma—Know the Facts

June is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Awareness Month. Seventy percent of adults in the U.S. have experienced some type of traumatic event at least once in their lives, with up to 20% of these go on to develop PTSD.

May 2021 - Mental Health Month

Each year millions of Americans face the reality of living with a mental illness. This health observance highlights the importance of mental health and wellness. Learn more:

May 2021—Stamp Out Stigma—Know the Facts

May Mental Health Month highlights the importance of speaking openly about mental health. One in five adults in the U.S. experience a mental health condition within a given year. Youth mental health is worsening, with severe depression rates continually increasing. While this is important to address year-round, emphasizing mental health awareness during May provides a time for people to come together and help reduce mental illness stigma.

Here are some important facts you should know:

Remember, mental illness does not discriminate. Help us bring attention to the importance of sharing mental health stories and improving the lives of millions of Americans living with a mental illness.

April 2021—Stress Awareness Month

The observance aims to educate Americans about the prevalence and seriousness of stress, while highlighting helpful coping strategies. Here are some tips you should know:

  • Stress affects physical health. Studies have linked stress to heart disease, asthma, diabetes, obesity, gastrointestinal problems, depression and accelerated aging. Learn more.
  • Keep a journal to track stressors. Writing about what is generating your stress, then brainstorming for solutions, can empower you to reduce stress and anxiety. Track your stress.
  • Meditate mindfully to minimize chaos. Take quiet time to yourself, sit comfortably and breathe deeply. Practice these meditation tips.

April 2021—Stamp Out Stigma—Know the Facts

This month, Stamp Out Stigma is highlighting Alcohol Awareness. Learn more.

March 2021—National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week

The observance aims to counteract myths about substance use and addiction, while educating people about the current science on substance use. Here are some tips you should know:

March 2021—Stamp Out Stigma—Know the Facts

Stamp Out Stigma is highlighting the importance of mental health support. Learn more.

February 2021—National School Counseling Week

The observance acknowledges counselors for partnering with parents in addressing the challenges of raising children in today’s world. Here are some tips you should know:

  • Talk with your child. If you think your child might be suffering the effects of stress, anxiety or depression, make time to talk with them. Learn more about how to ask them about their feelings.
  • Nurture their well-being. Encourage your child to get regular exercise, spend time with supportive friends, eat healthy foods and get enough sleep. Practice these tips.
  • Seek help if needed. It’s normal for a child to be moody or sad occasionally. However, if these feelings last for weeks or months, depression may be the cause. Learn more.

February 2021—Stamp Out Stigma—Know the Facts

Stamp Out Stigma is highlighting the power of kindness. Learn more.

  • Five random acts of kindness in a week will increase your happiness for up to three months.
  • When you are kind to another person, your brain’s pleasure and reward centers light up, as if you were the recipient of the good deed—not the giver.
  • When we give of ourselves, everything from life satisfaction to self-realization and physical health is significantly improved.
  • Kindness stimulates the production of serotonin. This feel-good chemical heals your wounds, calms you down, and makes you happy.

January 2021—National Get Organized Month

Being disorganized can cause us to lose focus and waste energy. Here are some tips to keep a disorganized home or workspace from draining you:

January 2021—Stamp Out Stigma—Know the Facts

Stamp Out Stigma is taking the opportunity this month to bring awareness to mental health after the new year.

  • Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is estimated to affect 10 million Americans.
  • 48% of all transgender adults report they have considered suicide in the past 12 months, compared to 4% of the overall US population
  • 60% of people who achieve their New Year’s resolutions flop once-or more-before succeeding.
  • Black adults in the US are more likely than white adults to report persistent symptoms of emotional distress, such as sadness or helplessness.

Visit these organizations’ websites to learn more

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention
NAMI
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