Find content from previous months below

Mind Your Mental Health is Magellan Healthcare’s educational initiative designed to raise awareness about mental health and mental illness.

2022 Content

April

Stress Awareness Month

Stress is a normal part of human existence. Good stress (eustress) pushes us to strive and achieve, but bad stress—particularly when it’s severe and/or lasts a long time—is highly destructive to our health.  

Alcohol Awareness Month

Alcohol is the most commonly used addictive substance in the United States: 14.5 million people ages 12 and older had alcohol use disorder. This number includes 9.0 million men and 5.5 million women. Learn more about alcohol use disorder. Here are some important facts you should know:

March

National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week

Despite positive developments in the U.S. such as reductions in opioid use, research has identified many facts illustrating the continuing seriousness of substance abuse.

LGBTQ+ Mental Health + World Bipolar Day

One in five Americans struggle with some kind of mental health condition, yet many don’t seek treatment. The largest barriers for those with mental health conditions are lack of accessibility to professional treatment, the stigma surrounding mental health, or a lack of knowledge about mental health conditions. Here are some important facts you should know:

  • About 17% of all people will self-harm during their lifetime. 90% of people who engage in self-harm begin during their teen or pre-adolescent years.
  • Bipolar disorder affects approximately 6 million adult Americans.

  • The average age-of-onset is about 25, but it can occur in the teens, or more uncommonly, in childhood.

February

National Cancer Prevention Awareness Month

The stress that comes with a cancer diagnosis can be overwhelming. One in three people with cancer experience mental or emotional distress. Learn more about the role of mental health in helping cancer patients and caregivers.

Download this helpful flyer for cancer support tips.

The Power of Kindness

You never know if someone is experiencing a mental health condition, and many physical disabilities are invisible. Practicing kindness encourages patience and empathy. Here are some important facts you should know:

  • After a month of a group of highly anxious individuals performing at least six acts of kindness a week, there was a significant increase in positive moods, relationship satisfaction and a decrease in social avoidance in socially anxious individuals.

  • Five random acts of kindness in a week will increase your happiness for up to three months.

  • When you are kind to another person, your brain’s pleasure and reward centers light up, as if you were the recipient of the good deed. This phenomenon is called the “helper’s high.”

  • When we give of ourselves, everything from life satisfaction to self-realization and physical health is significantly improved. Mortality is delayed, depression is reduced and well-being and good fortune are increased.

January

Get Organized Month

Studies show that people waste up to an hour every day, on average, searching for things that they’ve misplaced. The new calendar year is a good time to enhance your organization skills, so your life runs more smoothly.

Mental Health After the Holidays

2021 Content

December

National Stress-Free Family Holidays Month

This year, try de-emphasizing the hustle, bustle and material excesses that can accompany the winter holidays. This is a time to celebrate the contributions of family caregivers and provide them with the tools and support they need to keep themselves and their care recipients healthy. Learn more:

  • Many family caregivers also work outside the home, often experiencing conflicts between competing responsibilities. Learn how to take care of yourself.
  • The stress and daily challenges of caregiving can have a major impact on a caregiver’s mental health, leading to depression, anxiety, substance misuse and stress disorders. Learn how to reduce stress.
  • Research shows that caregiving responsibilities also take a significant physical and financial toll on caregivers. Practice these caregiving tips.

The impact of the holidays on our mental health

During the month of December, we are taking the opportunity to to bring more awareness around how the holidays affect us. Here are some important facts:

  • Nearly half of Americans report sometimes or always feeling alone (46 percent) or left out (47 percent).
  • Depression affects 20-25% of Americans ages 18+ in a given year.
  • 64 percent of people say their mental health stress level increases exponentially around this time of year.
November

National Family Caregivers Month

This is a time to celebrate the contributions of family caregivers and provide them with the tools and support they need to keep themselves and their care recipients healthy. Learn more:

  • Many family caregivers also work outside the home, often experiencing conflicts between competing responsibilities.  Learn how to take care of yourself.
  • The stress and daily challenges of caregiving can have a major impact on a caregiver’s mental health, leading to depression, anxiety, substance misuse and stress disorders. Learn how to reduce stress.
  • Research shows that caregiving responsibilities also take a significant physical and financial toll on caregivers. Practice these caregiving tips.

 

The importance of caregivers

During the month of November, we are taking the opportunity to discuss the importance of caregivers and the vital work they do each and every day. Being a caregiver can be a labor of love, but it can also be stressful. This month learn how you can be an effective caregiver while also taking care of yourself. Here are some important facts:

October

National Depression and Mental Health Awareness and Screening Month

This observance is designed to educate the public about the signs, symptoms and treatment options for depression, and to encourage those who might be suffering to respond to a brief, confidential battery of questions—a mental health screening. Learn more:

  • Depression is extremely common, and helping others know that they are not alone (thus reducing stigma) can be very encouraging.  Read about depression.
  • Screenings aren’t considered a professional evaluation, but they are a quick and uncomplicated way to spot some of the early signs of potential trouble. Learn more.
  • Don’t be afraid to share your own experience of depression with those who are currently struggling. Find out how to talk to others. 

Mental Health Education

During the month of October, we are taking the opportunity this month to bring more awareness to general mental health education, as well as depression awareness.. It’s our job to help end the stigma surrounding mental health by sharing resources and starting conversations. We will encourage you to learn more about mental illness and what resources are available to help those find treatment.

September

Suicide Prevention Awareness

This observance raises awareness and connects individuals experiencing suicidal ideation to treatment services, in addition to offering support to those previously affected by suicide. Learn more:

 

Stamp Out Stigma—National Recovery Month

During the month of September, we are taking the opportunity to discuss substance use disorder recovery. It’s our job to help end the stigma surrounding mental health by sharing resources and starting conversations. We will encourage you to learn more about mental illness and substance use disorder and what resources are available to help those find treatment. Here are some important facts you should know:

August

International Friendship Day

The first Sunday in August (8/1 this year) is International Friendship Day—a day to celebrate both the old and the new friends in our lives. Learn more:

Back to School

August is normally the back-to-school month for most students. This year might be a little different, so we are taking the opportunity to discuss student mental health throughout the month. Here are some important facts you should know:

July

BIPOC Mental Health

This health observance brings awareness to the unique struggles that individuals within the BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and People of Color) communities face in regard to mental illnessLearn more: 

As hard as it is for anyone to get proper mental health care in the United States, it’s even harder for racial, ethnic, religious and gender minorities. Not only are there the problems most of us experience, but there are added burdens of access and quality-of-care. Learn more:

  • Native Americans have the highest rate of young adult suicide of any ethnicity.
  • African Americans are 10% more likely to report having serious psychological distress than Non-Hispanic whites.
  • Lack of cultural understanding by health care providers may contribute to underdiagnosis and/or misdiagnosis of mental illness in people from racially/ethnically diverse populations.
June

National PTSD Awareness Month

Approximately eight million Americans at any given time suffer with post-traumatic stress disorder. This observance seeks to raise public awareness about issues related to PTSD, reduce the stigma associated with PTSD and help those suffering with this condition obtain needed treatment. Learn more:

  • PTSD can cause different types of symptoms. There are resources readily available to help diagnose and effectively treat PTSD. Learn the signs in this video.
  • Be there for support. When someone you care about has PTSD, the person may act differently and get angry easily. Follow these helpful tips.
  • Treatment is available. Helpful treatments include therapy, medications, peer support and more. Find treatment options.

June is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Awareness Month. Seventy percent of adults in the U.S. have experienced some type of traumatic event at least once in their lives, with up to 20% of these go on to develop PTSD.

May

Mental Health Month

Each year millions of Americans face the reality of living with a mental illness. This health observance highlights the importance of mental health and wellness. Learn more:

May Mental Health Month highlights the importance of speaking openly about mental health. One in five adults in the U.S. experience a mental health condition within a given year. Youth mental health is worsening, with severe depression rates continually increasing. While this is important to address year-round, emphasizing mental health awareness during May provides a time for people to come together and help reduce mental illness stigma.

Here are some important facts you should know:

April

Stress Awareness Month

The observance aims to educate Americans about the prevalence and seriousness of stress, while highlighting helpful coping strategies. Here are some tips you should know:

  • Stress affects physical health. Studies have linked stress to heart disease, asthma, diabetes, obesity, gastrointestinal problems, depression and accelerated aging. Learn more.
  • Keep a journal to track stressors. Writing about what is generating your stress, then brainstorming for solutions, can empower you to reduce stress and anxiety. Track your stress.
  • Meditate mindfully to minimize chaos. Take quiet time to yourself, sit comfortably and breathe deeply. Practice these meditation tips.

Alcohol Awareness

March

National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week

The observance aims to counteract myths about substance use and addiction, while educating people about the current science on substance use. Here are some tips you should know:

Mental Health Support

February

National School Counseling Week

The observance acknowledges counselors for partnering with parents in addressing the challenges of raising children in today’s world. Here are some tips you should know:

  • Talk with your child. If you think your child might be suffering the effects of stress, anxiety or depression, make time to talk with them. Learn more about how to ask them about their feelings.
  • Nurture their well-being. Encourage your child to get regular exercise, spend time with supportive friends, eat healthy foods and get enough sleep. Practice these tips.
  • Seek help if needed. It’s normal for a child to be moody or sad occasionally. However, if these feelings last for weeks or months, depression may be the cause. Learn more.

The Power of Kindness

  • Five random acts of kindness in a week will increase your happiness for up to three months.
  • When we give of ourselves, everything from life satisfaction to self-realization and physical health is significantly improved.
  • Kindness stimulates the production of serotonin. This feel-good chemical heals your wounds, calms you down, and makes you happy.
January

Get Organized Month

Being disorganized can cause us to lose focus and waste energy. Here are some tips to keep a disorganized home or workspace from draining you:

Mental Health After the Holidays

  • Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is estimated to affect 10 million Americans.
  • 48% of all transgender adults report they have considered suicide in the past 12 months, compared to 4% of the overall US population
  • 60% of people who achieve their New Year’s resolutions flop once-or more-before succeeding.
  • Black adults in the US are more likely than white adults to report persistent symptoms of emotional distress, such as sadness or helplessness.

Visit these organizations’ websites to learn more

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention
NAMI
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